ISSUES: History shows we won’t stop Superport Fundy. So can we change history?

So what has changed since 2015? NOVEMBER 2015, UPDATED DECEMBER 2018 Once more, efforts are being made to build pipelines and build oil and gas infrastructure in Saint John. With the increased traffic and risks to the Bay of Fundy, environmentalists continue … Continue reading ISSUES: History shows we won’t stop Superport Fundy. So can we change history?

ISSUES: So you think the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline is dead? Think again! Coming soon to Atlantica?

Keystone Redux: TransCanada is Now Seeking An Ocean Route for its Dirty Tar Sands

Danielle Droitsch’s Blog

Natural Resources Defence Council, Posted January 21, 2016

The company that lost a bid to build the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline (and has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. government for $15 billion for lost profits) is eyeing to get its tar sands oil to the Gulf Coast another way: by sea. TransCanada is proposing a scheme that would start as a pipeline in Alberta terminating at Canada’s Bay of Fundy and then continue by supertanker moving tar sands through the Gulf of Maine, to Louisiana and Texas, with stops at major ports along the East coast and by the tip of Florida. So far, Canadian federal decision-makers are ignoring the risk that this proposal presents to U.S. coasts and fisheries even as the National Academy of Sciences has found that tar sands spills are more devastating than conventional oil to water sources and spill responders are unequipped for cleanups. But Canadian public opposition to the project is fierce as demonstrated by another major announcement that the City of Montreal and the Montreal Metropolitan Community representing 82 municipalities and nearly 4 million people are now officially opposed to the project.
TransCanada hopes Americans won’t notice. They’re calling it “Energy East,” but let’s call it what it is: Keystone East.
energyEast_tankers_20151209 (2).jpg
A tar sands pipeline and tanker scheme

Energy East would carry 1.1 million barrels of tar sands oil a day (bpd) from Alberta to New Brunswick; this is 35 percent larger than Keystone XL. The pipeline portion of the project would traverse Canada2,850 miles (4,600 kilometers). It would convert an aging natural gas pipeline in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario (1,860 miles in length), and build new pipe in Alberta, Quebec, and New Brunswick (930 miles in length).
Based on an application submitted to Canadian regulators last month, most of the oil transported by Energy East would be loaded onto more than 280 oil supertankers carrying between 1 million and 2 million barrels that will travel down the U.S. east coast. Over the course of a year, this virtual pipeline by water would move up to 328 million barrels of tar sands oil down the east coast. This project would result in an increase five times more oil tanker traffic from current oil tanker traffic along the Atlantic seaboard every year.
Therefore, TransCanada’s reincarnated Keystone plan–Energy East–is not just a new pipeline project. It is a pipeline-tanker scheme that would bring millions more Continue reading “ISSUES: So you think the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline is dead? Think again! Coming soon to Atlantica?”